Italian language series: Pinocchio, chapter 10

This post brings you to chapter 10 in your study of the original Italian version of Le avventure di Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi. In this tenth chapter, Pinocchio is recognised by his wooden brothers at the Grand Marionette Theatre, but he also risks becoming a piece of firewood for Mangiafoco. In the index, you will find a link where you can read the entire book … Continue reading Italian language series: Pinocchio, chapter 10

Italian language series: Pinocchio, chapter 9

This post brings you to chapter 9 in your study of the original Italian version of Le avventure di Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi. In this ninth chapter, the little rascal Pinocchio sells his newly acquired alphabet book so that he can gain admission to the marionette show and, in the process, skip school. In the index, you will find a link where you can consult the entire … Continue reading Italian language series: Pinocchio, chapter 9

Italian language series: Pinocchio, chapter 8

In this post, your study of Italian will cover the entirety of chapter 8 of Le avventure di Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi. In this eighth chapter, Pinocchio gets his feet replaced, and Geppetto sells his coat so that he can buy Pinocchio the alphabet book he needs for school. If you wish to consult Le avventure di Pinocchio online, you will find a link in the index … Continue reading Italian language series: Pinocchio, chapter 8

Italian language series: Pinocchio, chapter 7 (part 4)

In this fourth and final part of chapter 7 from Le avventure di Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi, Pinocchio resigns himself to eating the cores and skins of the pears so as to placate his hunger. The first portion of text you will consider here reads as follows: Quando Pinocchio in due bocconi ebbe mangiata la prima pera, fece l’atto di buttar via il torsolo; ma Geppetto gli … Continue reading Italian language series: Pinocchio, chapter 7 (part 4)

Italian language series: Genesi 3:15-24, caduta dell’uomo

This post concludes your study of chapter 3 of the book of Genesis in Italian, version Diodati 1821, with verses 15-24. I have translated the verses rather literally into English to help you grasp the sense of the Italian text. When you have finished working through this post, I encourage you to reread the chapter to appreciate your new understanding of the text in Italian. … Continue reading Italian language series: Genesi 3:15-24, caduta dell’uomo

Italian language series: Genesi 3:9-14, caduta dell’uomo

This post continues your study of the Italian language used in chapter 3 of the book of Genesis, or il libro della Genesi; you will now examine verses 9-14, where God asks Adam how he came to know that he was naked, and whether or not he ate from the tree whose fruit had been forbidden to him and his woman. Your study uses the … Continue reading Italian language series: Genesi 3:9-14, caduta dell’uomo

Italian language series: Pinocchio, chapter 7 (part 3)

Pinocchio is starving, but he still manages to turn his nose up at food that has been offered to him. This post continues your study of chapter 7 of Le avventure di Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi. The first portion of text you will consider here reads: E il povero Pinocchio cominciò a piangere e a berciare così forte, che lo sentivano da cinque chilometri lontano. Geppetto, che … Continue reading Italian language series: Pinocchio, chapter 7 (part 3)

Italian language series: Leonardo da Vinci, aphorism 1

Aforismo 1 Chi vol essere ricco in un dì è impiccato in un anno. — Leonardo da Vinci Here is my translation of the aphorism: He who wishes to be rich in day is hanged within a year. For study purposes, here now is a literal translation of the aphorism, including accents in the Italian to show the stressed syllable of a word: Chi vol … Continue reading Italian language series: Leonardo da Vinci, aphorism 1

Italian language series: Il Principe, chapter III (part 3)

In this post, you will continue your study of the third chapter of Niccolò Machiavelli’s Il Principe. In the portions of text to be examined here, Machiavelli explains the importance of a prince’s relocation to an acquired land, and why those who have been offended by him must be crushed thoroughly. The first portion of text you will consider here reads as follows: Questo farebbe più … Continue reading Italian language series: Il Principe, chapter III (part 3)

Italian language series: translation exercise 20

If you have worked through the last four posts pertaining to your study of the language used in Le avventure di Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi, that is, part 1 and part 2 of chapter 6, and part 1 and part 2 of chapter 7, then test your knowledge of the usages you have encountered by translating the following sentences from English to Italian. He is … Continue reading Italian language series: translation exercise 20