Friulian language series: Gjenesi 27, benedizion di Jacop

You have now come to the twenty-seventh chapter in your study of the book of Genesis through the Friulian language. The subject matter of this chapter is: la benedizion di Jacop (blessing of Jacob).

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Read Gjenesi 27

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Versets 1-5

Vocabulary: deventâ (to become), vieli (old), indebulîsi (to weaken; also indebilîsi), la viste (vision, eyesight), viodi (to see), dibot (almost), nuie (nothing), clamâ (to call), prin (first), il fi (son), rispuindi (to respond), murî (to die), di cumò a dibot (any moment now), cjapâ sù (to pick up, to take up), un argagn (instrument, tool), la frece (arrow), il boç des frecis (quiver), un arc (bow), lâ fûr par (to go out into), la campagne (field, country), puartâ dongje (to bring back), il salvadi (game [meat]), preparâ (to prepare), il plat (dish), plasê (to please), tant (so much), la anime (soul), benedî (to bless), prime che (before), lâsint (to leave, to depart), scoltâ (to listen), partî par (to leave for), copâ (to kill), salvadi (wild).

Verse 1: Isac al jere deventât vieli: Isaac had become old. I si jere indebulide la viste: his vision had weakened on him. The verb indebulî (or indebilî) means to weaken, to make weak; for example, la fiere lu à indebilît means the fever has weakened him. The reflexive indebulîsi means to weaken, to become weak; i si jere indebulide la viste can be taken literally as the vision had weakened unto him. The Friulian for weak is debil. Nol viodeve dibot nuie: he could see almost nothing; note that Friulian uses a double negative here. Isaac calls out to his son: fi gno (my son), and Esau acknowledges that he has been addressed: ben? (yes?).

Verse 2: O pues murî di cumò a dibot: I could (can) die any moment now. O pues (I can, I am able) is the first-person singular of the presint indicatîf of the verb podê.

Verse 3: Cjape sù i tiei argagns, il boç des frecis e l’arc: take up your gear, quiver and bow. Puartimi dongje salvadi: bring me back game.

Verse 4: Preparimi un plat (prepare me a dish) di chei che (from [amongst] those that) mi plasin tant (I like so much; literally, are so pleasing to me) e puartimal (and bring it to me). A plasin is the third-person plural of the presint indicatîf of the verb plasê; it is in plural form to agree in number with chei che (those that). Another example: mi plasin tant i siei plats (I like his dishes very much; literally, his dishes are very pleasing to me). Lâsint (to leave, to depart) is used here in the sense of to die. Isaac says to his son: la mê anime ti benedissarà (my soul will bless you) prime che mi’nt ledi (before I depart [in death]). Following prime che, the subjunctive is used; in this case, it is the present subjunctive. Compare: m’int voi (I depart); prime che m’int ledi (before I depart). In the text of this verse, you find mi + int contracted as mi’nt, rather than m’int, which is to be taken as a written variant.

Verse 5: Ma Rebeche e veve scoltât dut ce che Isac i veve dit a Esaù: but Rebekah had listened to everything that Isaac had said to Esau. Copâ robe salvadie par so pari: to hunt game for his father.

Versets 6-10

Vocabulary: intant (meanwhile), il fo (son), a pene (barely, just now), sintî (to hear), il pari (father), (to say), il fradi (brother), puartâ dongje (to bring back), salvadi (wild), preparâ (to prepare), il plat (dish), mangjâ (to eat), benedî (to bless), devant di (before, in front of), prime di (before), murî (to die), scoltâ (to listen), il trop (flock), doi (two), biel (nice, fine), il cjavret (kid; of the goat), il gustâ (dinner [lunch]), propit come che (just how), plasê (to be pleasing), puartâ (to bring).

Verse 6: O ai a pene sintût che to pari i diseve a to fradi: I have just heard what your father said (was saying) to your brother; o ai (I have) a pene (just; just now) sintût (heard).

Verse 7: Devant dal Signôr: before the Lord. Prime di murî: before dying; before I die.

Verse 8: Alore, frut gno: now, my son; well, my son. Scoltimi me e fâs ce che ti dîs jo: listen to me and do what I tell you.

Verse 9: Va tal trop e puartimi doi biei cjavrets: go to (into) the flock and bring me two fine kids. Propit come che i plâs a lui: just how he likes, just the way he likes; literally, just how it is pleasing to him. Al plâs is the third-person singular of the presint indicatîf of plasê. Another example: chest libri mi plâs (I like this book; literally, this book is pleasing to me).

Verse 10: Tu jal puartarâs a to pari: you will bring it to your father.

Versets 11-15

Vocabulary: la mari (mother), tignî a ments (to bear in mind, to remember), il fradi (brother), pelôs (hairy), a la cuâl che (whereas), la piel (skin), slis (smooth), salacôr (perhaps, what if), palpâ (to touch), inacuarzisi (to notice, to realise), cirî di (to try to, to seek to), imbroiâ (to trick, to fool), impen di (instead of), la benedizion (blessing), la maludizion (curse), rispuindi (to respond), cjapâ (to take), ubidî (to obey), lâ a cirî (to fethc, to go get), puartâ (to bring), il gustâ (dinner [lunch]), deventâ mat (to go mad), biel (nice, fine), i vistîts (clothing, clothes), il prin fi (firstborn son), la cjase (house), meti intor (to put on; of clothing), secont (second).

Verse 11: Rebekah wants her favourite son Jacob to attempt to pass for his brother Esau, so as to receive his father’s blessing. Jacob reminds his mother about the physical difference between the two brothers: ten a ments che (bear in mind that; remember that) gno fradi Esaù al è pelôs (my brother Esau is hairy), a la cuâl che jo o ai la piel slisse (whereas I have smooth skin).

Verse 12: Jacob explains that his father might understand the ruse: salacôr gno pari al volarà palpâmi (what if my father wishes [will wish] to touch me) e alore si inacuarzarà (and then he will notice) che jo o ai cirût di imbroiâlu (that I have tried to fool him). The verb cirî means to look for, to seek. Cirî di followed by an infinitive takes on the sense of to seek to, to try to: cirî di imbroiâ (to seek to fool, to try to trick). Impen de benedizion, mi darà la maludizion: instead of a blessing, he will bring upon me (give me) a curse.

Verse 13: Rebekah objects to Jacob’s concerns. If Isaac should curse rather than bless Jacob, Rebekah will take the curse in his stead: mi cjapi jo la tô maludizion (I shall take your curse; literally, I take unto myself your curse). She tells her son to obey her: tu ubidissimi me (obey me), and to fetch what she has asked for: va a cirî ce che ti ai dit (fetch what I have said to you). Lâ a cirî can be taken more literally as to go seek; it is used the way English says to fetch, to go get.

Verse 14: Lui al lè a cjoliju: he went to get them. Jai puartà a sô mari: he brought them to his mother. Rebekah prepared the food for Isaac: i preparà un gustâ (she prepared a dinner [lunch] for him) di chei che (from [amongst] those that) so pari al deventave mat (his father went mad for; that is, that he liked very much indeed). The Friulian adjective mat means mad, crazy; deventâ mat, then, means to go (become) mad. Deventâ mat can be used in both a literal sense (to go insane) and figurative sense (to like very much); here it is clearly used in the second sense.

Verse 15: Rebekah took the finest clothes that Esau had in her house: e cjolè i plui biei vistîts che Esaù al veve in cjase di jê, and put them on Jacob: ju metè intor a Jacop. Meti intor is used here to talk about putting clothing on someone else (along with the preposition a), but it can also be used to talk about putting on one’s own clothing (with no preposition necessary); for example, al à metût intor il capot means he put his coat on. Intor is used where English has on; for example, al veve intor il capot means he had his coat on. Il prin fi: firstborn son; il secont fi: second(born) son.

Versets 16-20

Vocabulary: la piel (skin), il cjavret (kid; of goat), taponâ (to cover), il braç (arm), la part (part), slis (smooth), il cuel (neck), meti in man (to put in hand), il pan (bread), presentâ si di (to present oneself unto), ordenâ (to order, to command), jevâ sù (to get up, to arise), par plasê (please), comodâsi (to sit down), mangjâ (to eat), il salvadi (game), puartâ (to bring), dopo (then, after), la anime (soul), benedî (to bless), pôc (little, few), dâ une man (to assist, to help).

Verse 16: Rebekah dresses Jacob’s arms and neck with goat skin to simulate Esau’s hairiness. You read: cu la piel dai cjavrets (with the skin of the kids) i taponà i braçs (she covered his arms) e la part slisse dal cuel (and the smooth part of his neck).

Verse 17: Po i metè in man a so fi Jacop: then she put into the hands of her son Jacob; literally, then she put in hand unto her son Jacob.

Verse 18: Lui si presentà di so pari: he presented himself to his father. Pai: from pari, this is an affectionate term of address for a father. Ben?: well? Cui sêstu, fi gno?: who are you, my son?; by this, he means to ask which of his sons is before him.

Verse 19: Jeve sù, par plasê: arise, please; pray sit up. Comoditi e mangje il salvadi che ti ai puartât: sit and eat the game that I have brought you.

Verse 20: Isaac expresses surprise over how quickly his son, whom he has not determined to be Jacob, returned with the food: ce pôc che tu âs stât (how little [time] that you were). Jacob offers the following explanation: al è parcè che il Signôr mi à dade une man (it is because the Lord assisted me; literally, it is because the Lord has given me a hand).

Versets 21-25

Vocabulary: vignî ca (to come here), dongje di (alongside), palpâ (to touch), jessi sigûr (to be certain), il fi (son), lâi dongje a (to draw near to), la vôs (voice), il braç (arm), inacuarzisi (to notice, to realise), nuie (nothing), pelôs (hairy), il fradi (brother), benedî (to bless), domandâ (to ask), propit (indeed, really), rispuindi (to respond), puartâ ca (to bring here), mangjâ (to eat), la cjace (game, hunted animal), la anime (soul), servî (to serve), esibî (to present), il vin (wine), bevi (to drink).

Verse 21: Isaac tells his son Jacob to approach, to determine whether or not he is indeed Esau. He says: ven ca dongje di me che ti palpi (come here alongside me that I may touch you). Che functions here in the same way as par che (so that, in order that); it is followed the first-person singular of the coniuntîf presint, which is o palpi. By its form alone, you cannot distinguish between the first-person singular of the presint indicatîf and coniuntîf presint of the verb palpâ, for they are both o palpi. In verse 25, you will see an example of where the use of the subjunctive after (par) che is transparent. Par jessi sigûr se tu sês o no gno fi Esaù: in order to be certain whether or not you are my son Esau.

Verse 22: Isaac touches Jacob and remarks: la vôs e je chê di Jacop (the voice is that of Jacob), ma i braçs a son chei di Esaù (but the arms are those of Esau).

Verse 23: No si inacuargè di nuie: he did not notice anything. Braçs pelôs: hairy arms. Come chei di so fradi Esaù: like those of his brother Esau.

Verse 24: Sêstu propit gno fi Esaù?: are you indeed my son Esau?

Verse 25: Isaac tells his son to bring him the food: puarte ca (bring [it] here) ch’o puedi mangjâ de cjace di gno fi (that I may eat of the game of my son). You have another example here of the coniuntîf presint following (par) che; it is question of the verb podê (can, to be able). Unlike the instance of the coniuntîf presint in verse 21, which is indistinguishable from that of the presint indicatîf (both are o palpi), here the difference is clear: o pues (first-person singular, presint indicatîf), o puedi (first-person singular, coniuntîf presint). Par che la mê anime ti benedissi: in order that my soul may bless you. I esibì il vin: he put the wine before him; he presented him with the wine.

Versets 26-29

Vocabulary: il pari (father), vignî ca (to come here), dongje di (alongside), bussâ (to kiss), lâ dongje (to draw near), tirà sù (to take in), l’odôr (odour, scent), la munture (garments, clothing; also expressed as monture), benedî (to bless), compagn di (identical to), il cjamp (field), la rosade (dew), il cîl (heaven, sky), il gras (fat), la tiere (earth, land), la bondance (abundance), il forment (wheat, grain), il vin (wine), il popul (people), servî (to serve), il forest (foreigner), butâsi in genoglon (to go down on one’s knees), devant di (before, in front of), il paron (master), il fradi (brother), maludît (cursed), maludî (to curse), benedît (blessed), benedî (to bless).

Verse 26: Isaac tells Jacob to draw near and kiss him. He smells the odour of the goat skin on Jacob and is convinced that the son is indeed Esau, who, as a hunter, would have had the same smell. You will perhaps recall that the Friulian for hunter is il cjaçadôr; this noun is related to a new one encountered in verse 25: la cjace. Both of these are further related to the verb cjaçâ, meaning to hunt. The Friulian verb for to kiss is bussâ; Isaac says to Jacob: ven ca dongje di me e bussimi (come here alongside me and kiss me). Busse is, of course, the second-person singular imperative of bussâ; when mi is added, the final e changes to ibussimi, then, means kiss me. The noun kiss, on the other hand, is expressed in Friulian as la bussade. For example, dami une bussade means give me a kiss.

Verse 27: Isaac smells the scent of his son’s clothing; the expression tirâ sù is to be taken as meaning to take in, in the sense of to smell. I lè dongje e al bussà so pari, che al tirà sù l’odôr de sô munture: he drew near to his father, who took in the smell (smelled the scent) of his clothing. Isaac says that the smell of his son is like that of the field: sì, l’odôr di gno fi al è compagn dal odôr di cjamp (yes, the smell of my son is identical to the smell of the field) che il Signôr lu à benedît (that the Lord has blessed).

Verse 28: Che Diu ti dedi (may God give you) la rosade dal cîl (the dew of the heaven) e il gras de tiere (and the fat of the earth) e bondance di forment e di vin (and abundance of grain and wine). You find the third-person singular of the coniuntîf presint in che Diu ti dedi (may God give you).

Verse 29: Che i popui ti servissin: may the peoples serve you. Che i forescj si butin in genoglon devant di te: may the foreigners (or outsiders) go down on their knees before you (in deference). Tu sarâs paron dai tiei fradis: you shall be master of your brothers. The final sentence of the verse reads: che al sedi maludît chel che ti maludissarà (cursed be he who curses [will curse] you), che al sedi benedît chel che ti benedissarà (blessed be he who blesses [will bless] you).

Versets 30-34

Vocabulary: a pene (barely, only just), finî (to finish), benedî (to bless), juste (just), saltâ fûr di (to come out from), il pari (father), il fradi (brother), tornâ dongje (to come back), la cjace (hunt, hunting), preparâ (to prepare), il gustâ (dinner [lunch]), puartâ (to bring), jevâ sù (to arise, to get up), cerçâ (to taste; to eat), il salvadi (game), il fi (son), la anime (soul), domandâ (to ask), rispuindi (to respond), il prin fi (firstborn son), ingrisulâsi (to take fright), il spavent (fear), lâ a cjace (to go hunting), mangjâ (to eat), rivâ (to arrive, to come), sintî (to hear), petâ un berli (to burst into an outcry), la disperazion (despair), la rabie (anger).

Verse 30: Isac al veve a pene finît di benedî Jacop (Isaac had only just finished blessing Jacob) e Jacop al stave juste saltant fûr di li di so pari Isac (and Jacob was just leaving [coming out of] the presence of his his father) cuant che so fradi Esaù al tornà dongje de cjace (when his brother Esau came back from the hunt). In verse 25, the feminine cjace was used to refer to the meat obtained from a hunt; you now find it used to refer to the hunting trip itself. Li di so pari is to be taken in this context as his father’s presence; in a different context altogether, it could take on the sense of at his father’s place, at his father’s house.

Verse 31: In the second sentence, you find a number of present subjunctive forms: gno pari che al jevi sù (may my father arise), che al cerci il salvadi di so fi (may he eat [taste] the game of his son), par che la tô anime mi benedissi (so that your soul might bless me). Supplementary examples using the present subjunctive al benedissi: che Diu ti benedissi (may God bless you); che Diu al benedissi i puars (may God bless the poor).

Verse 32: Cui sêstu tu?: who are you? O soi il to prin fi, Esaù: I am your firstborn son, Esau.

Verse 33: Isaac is horrified upon realising that his blessing was not given to Esau: Isac s’ingrisulà di spavent (Isaac was horrified with [took a fright out of] fear). Like the feminine pôre, the masculine spavent means fear, fright. Supplementary examples of spavent: murî di spavent (to die of fear); chel palaç al è brut di fâ spavent (that building is frightfully ugly; literally, that building is ugly [so as] to cause fear). Fâ spavent is synonymous with fâ pôre (to frighten). Cui jerial alore chel che al è lât a cjace e mi à puartât il salvadi?: who was it then who went hunting and brought me game? Al jere is the masculine, third-person singular of the imperfet indicatîf of the verb jessi; its interrogative form is jerial. Prime che tu rivassis tu: before you arrived (were arriving). Tu tu rivassis is the second-person singular of the coniuntîf imperfet of the verb rivâ; the subjunctive is used following prime che. Below, you will find side-by-side the present and imperfect subjunctive conjugations of the verb rivâ. Also included is the present indicative so that you might review this conjugation as a model for verbs whose infinitive ends in â.

Verse 34: Cuant che Esaù al sintì so pari a fevelâ cussì: when Esau heard his father speaking so; that is, when Esau heard his father speaking these things. Al petà un grant berli di disperazion e di rabie: he burst into a great outcry of despair and anger; more literally, he burst (forth) a great outcry of despair and anger. The verb petâ means to burst; it can also be taken as to let out, but with force, violence. Benedissimi ancje me: bless me as well. Pai: affectionate term of address for a father.

Verb: RIVÂ
Presint indicatîf
Present indicative

affirmative
interrogative
jo
o rivi
rivio?
tu
tu rivis
rivistu?
lui
al rive
rivial?

e rive
rivie?

o rivìn
rivìno?
vualtris
o rivais
rivaiso?
lôr
a rivin
rivino?

Verb: RIVÂ
Coniuntîf presint — coniuntîf imperfet
Present subjunctive — imperfect subjunctive

present subjunctive imperfect subjunctive
jo
o rivi o rivàs
tu
tu rivis tu rivassis
lui
al rivi al rivàs

e rivi e rivàs

o rivìn o rivassin
vualtris
o rivais o rivassis
lôr
a rivin a rivassin

Versets 35-39

Vocabulary: rispuindi (to respond), il fradi (brother), vignî (to come), la baronade (guile, slyness), robâ (to steal), la benedizion (blessing), dibant (in vain, for nothing), meti non (to name), imbroiâ (to trick, to fool), la volte (time), benzà (already), cjoli (to take), il dirit di prin fi (birthright), puartâ vie (to take away), propit (indeed, really), cjapâ la peraule (to speak in turn), distinâ (to designate), il paron (master), jessi sot di (to serve; literally, to be under), proviodi (to provide), il forment (wheat, grain), il vin (wine), restâ (to remain, to be left), tasê (to remain silent), tacâ a berlâ (to start crying out), vaî (to cry, to weep), lâ a stâ (to go dwell), lontan di (far from, away from), gras (fat), la rosade (dew), vignî jù (to come down), il cîl (heaven, sky).

Verse 35: Isaac tells his son Esau: to fradi al è vignût cu la baronade (your brother came with guile) e ti à robade la benedizion (and has stolen the blessing from you).

Verse 36: Esau says that the naming of his brother as Jacob (meaning either supplanter or one who follows on another’s heels) was appropriate: dibant no i àn metût non Jacop (he was not named Jacob in vain). Dibant means in vain, for nothing; it could have been placed at the end of the sentence as well: no i àn metût non Jacop dibant. Supplementary examples of dibant: lu ai fat dibant (I did it in vain, I did it for nothing); «graciis», «dibant» (“thanks,” “do not mention it”). Mi à imbroiât dôs voltis: he has fooled me twice. Mi veve benzà cjolt il gno dirit di prin fi: he had already taken my birthright. No âstu propit nissune benedizion par me?: have you indeed no blessing for me?

Verse 37: Jo lu ai distinât a jessi il to paron: I have designated him to be your master. I ai dit che ducj i siei fradis a vevin di jessi sot di lui: I told him that all his brothers were to serve him (be beneath him). Lu ai proviodût di forment e di vin: I provided him grain and wine. After his explanations, Isaac says to Esau: ce mi restial mo par te, fi gno? (what now do I have left you, my son?). Al reste is the masculine, third-person singular of the presint indicatîf of the verb restâ; its interrogative form is restial: al reste (it remains); ce restial? (what remains?); ce mi restial? (what remains unto me?; that is, what do I have left?, what do I have remaining?).

Verse 38: Âstu dome chê benedizion?: have you only that blessing? The verb tasê means to keep quiet, to remain silent, to not speak. You read: ma Isac al taseve (but Isaac remained [was remaining] silent) e Esaù al tacà a berlâ e a vaî (and Esau started crying out and weeping). Supplementary examples of the verb tasê: miôr tasê che cjacarâ par dibant (it is better to keep quiet than to chatter pointlessly); o volevi rispuindi ma o ai decidût di tasê (I wanted to respond, but I decided to remain silent); o che o tasês o che o lês fûr de stanzie (you either keep quiet or you leave the room); o ai tasût tancj agns ma cumò vonde (I have remained silent for so many years, but now enough is enough). After the notes for verse 39, you will find a number of conjugations charts for the verb tasê. You can use tasê as a model conjugation for verbs whose infinitive ends in ê. The past participle of tasê is tasût. The three imperative forms of this verb are tâs (second-person singular), tasìn (first-person plural) and tasêt (second-person plural).

Verse 39: Tu larâs a stâ lontan de tiere grasse: you shall go dwell away from the fat of the earth (the fat earth). Lontan de rosade ch’e ven jù dal cîl: away from the dew that comes down from the heaven.

Verb: TASÊ
Presint indicatîf
Present indicative

affirmative
interrogative
jo
o tâs
tasio?
tu
tu tasis
tasistu?
lui
al tâs
tasial?

e tâs
tasie?

o tasìn
tasìno?
vualtris
o tasês
tasêso?
lôr
a tasin
tasino?

Verb: TASÊ
Imperfet indicatîf
Imperfect indicative

affirmative
interrogative
jo
o tasevi
tasevio?
tu
tu tasevis
tasevistu?
lui
al taseve
tasevial?

e taseve
tasevie?

o tasevin
tasevino?
vualtris
o tasevis
taseviso?
lôr
a tasevin
tasevino?

Verb: TASÊ
Passât sempliç
Simple past

affirmative
interrogative
jo
o tasei
taserio?
tu
tu taseris
taseristu?
lui
al tasè
taserial?

e tasè
taserie?

o taserin
taserino?
vualtris
o taseris
taseriso?
lôr
a taserin
taserino?

Verb: TASÊ
Futur sempliç
Simple future

affirmative
interrogative
jo
o tasarai
tasaraio?
tu
tu tasarâs
tasarâstu?
lui
al tasarà
tasaraial?

e tasarà
tasaraie?

o tasarìn
tasarìno?
vualtris
o tasarês
tasarêso?
lôr
a tasaran
tasarano?

Verb: TASÊ
Condizionâl presint
Present conditional

affirmative
interrogative
jo
o tasarès
tasaressio?
tu
tu tasaressis
tasaressistu?
lui
al tasarès
tasaressial?

e tasarès
tasaressie?

o tasaressin
tasaressino?
vualtris
o tasaressis
tasaressiso?
lôr
a tasaressin
tasaressino?

Verb: TASÊ
Coniuntîf presint — coniuntîf imperfet
Present subjunctive — imperfect subjunctive

present subjunctive
imperfect subjunctive
jo
o tasi
o tasès
tu
tu tasis
tu tasessis
lui
al tasi
al tasès

e tasi
e tasès

o tasìn
o tasessin
vualtris
o tasês
o tasessis
lôr
a tasin
a tasessin

Versets 40-46

Vocabulary: vuadagnâsi la bocjade (to earn one’s daily bread), la spade (sword), il sotan (slave), sfrancjâsi (to break free, to liberate oneself), crevâ (to break), il jôf (yoke), il cuel (neck), cjapâ in asse (to take to hating), par vie di (on account of), aromai (at this point, by this time), lunc (long), in chê volte (at that time), copâ (to kill), contâ (to tell, to relate), mandâ a clamâ (to send for), cirî di (to seek to, to try to), svindicâsi (to avenge oneself, to get revenge), scoltâ (to listen), lâsint (to go away, to depart), scjampâ (to flee), il fradi (brother), stâ cun (to stay with), fintremai che (until such time as), passâ (to pass), la rabie (anger, rage), slontanâsi (to distance oneself), dismenteâ (to forget), fâ une part (to do a [bad] deed), là vie (there), pierdi (to lose), la zornade (day), lâ indevant (to continue, to go forward; to withstand), la fie (daughter), un itit (Hittite), cjoli une femine (to take a wife), impuartâ (to matter), il mont (world).

Verse 40: Tu ti vuadagnarâs la bocjade cu la tô spade: you shall earn your daily bread by your sword. The Friulian verb vuadagnâ means to earn. Tu sarâs sotan di to fradi: you shall be your brother’s slave. Cuant che tu ti sfrancjarâs: when you free (will free) yourself. Tu crevarâs il so jôf dal to cuel: you shall break his yoke from your neck.

Verse 41: Esaù al cjapà in asse Jacop: Esau took to hating Jacob. Aromai gno pari no le à lungje: my father no longer has long to live; literally, by now my father does not have it long. In chê volte o coparai gno fradi Jacop: at that time (that is, after his father’s death) I shall kill my brother Jacob.

Verse 42: E mandà a clamâ Jacop: she sent for Jacob. Mandâ a clamâ translates literally as to send to call; it can be taken as meaning to send for. Viôt che to fradi al cîr dome di svindicâsi e ti coparà: know that your brother seeks only to avenge himself and he will kill you. Viôt che translates literally as see that; viôt is the second-person singular imperative of the verb viodi.

Verse 43: Vatint: leave; depart. Scjampe li di gno fradi Laban a Caran: flee to my brother’s place in Haran.

Verse 44: Tu starâs un pôc cun lui: you will stay with him for a while. Rebekah tells Jacob to stay with Laban until Esau’s fury has passed: fintremai che i sarà passade a to fradi (until it passes [will have passed] from unto your brother); the sense of this is: until your brother is no longer so angry about it; until your brother’s anger subsides.

Verse 45: Fintremai cuant che la rabie di to fradi no si sarà slontanade di te (until your brother’s anger towards you has subsided; literally, until your brother’s anger will have distanced itself from you). E [fintremai] che nol varà dismenteade la part che tu i âs fate: and until he forgets [will have forgotten] the deed that you have carried out against him. Alore ti mandarai a clamâ là vie: then I shall send for you from there. Àio propit di pierdius ducj i doi intune sole zornade?: must I indeed lose both of you on the same day? O ai di means I have to, I must; its interrogative form, then, is aio di? (do I have to?, must I?). Pierdius is the combination of pierdi (to lose) + us (you, plural). Intune sole zornade: literally, in one single day.

Verse 46: Rebekah alludes to Esau’s Hittite wives: no pues plui lâ indevant cu lis fiis dai itits (I can no longer withstand [go forward with] the daughters of the Hittites); that is, she has become weary of them. La tiere di It: the land of Heth. Se Jacop al cjol une des feminis de tiere di It come chestis culì (if Jacob takes one of the women from the land of Heth like these ones), no m’impuarte plui di stâ in chest mont (it matters to me no more to remain in this world).