Italian language series: Genesi 3:9-14, la caduta dell’uomo

This post continues your study of the Italian language used in chapter 3 of the book of Genesis, or il libro della Genesi; you will now examine verses 9-14, where God asks Adam how he came to know that he was naked, and whether or not he ate from the tree whose fruit had been forbidden to him and his woman. Your study uses the … Continue reading Italian language series: Genesi 3:9-14, la caduta dell’uomo

Friulian language series: Gjenesi 2:4-14, paradîs dal Eden

You will now continue your study of the Friulian language through verses from the Bible by examining Gjenesi 2:4-14; that is, verses 4-14 of the second chapter of the book of Genesis, where the subject is il paradîs dal Eden (paradise of Eden), also called il zardin dal Eden (garden of Eden). The text of the Bible that you will read is made available by … Continue reading Friulian language series: Gjenesi 2:4-14, paradîs dal Eden

Friulian language series: Gjenesi 2:1-3, tal imprin

This post continues your study of the Friulian language as used in the Bible; you will now begin your study of the second chapter of the book of Genesis. In this post, you will examine verses 1-3; that is, Gjenesi 2:1-3. The text of the Bible that you will read is made available by Glesie Furlane, in Bibie par un popul. If you are arriving … Continue reading Friulian language series: Gjenesi 2:1-3, tal imprin

Friulian language series: Gjenesi 1:26-31, tal imprin

You will now continue your study of the Friulian language through verses from the Bible by examining Gjenesi 1:26-31; that is, verses 26-31 of the first chapter of the book of Genesis. These are the final six verses of the chapter. The text of the Bible that you will read is made available by Glesie Furlane, in Bibie par un popul. If you are arriving … Continue reading Friulian language series: Gjenesi 1:26-31, tal imprin

Friulian language series: possessive adjectives

This post summarises how to say in Friulian such things as il gno popul (my people), il to non (your name), i tiei nemîs (your enemies), i nestris oms (our men), lis lôr bandieris (their flags), etc., using possessive adjectives. The examples that appear after the chart were taken from the Friulian Bible; one example is given for each item in the chart. The abbreviated … Continue reading Friulian language series: possessive adjectives

Friulian language series: present indicative of the verb vê

Vê is the Friulian verb for to have. In the affirmative presint indicatîf (present indicative), the tonic pronouns listed below are optional, but the atonic pronouns are mandatory and appear before the verb. For example, I have can be expressed as jo o ai or simply o ai; you have can be expressed as tu tu âs or simply tu âs; he has can be … Continue reading Friulian language series: present indicative of the verb vê

Friulian language series: present indicative of the verb jessi

Jessi is the Friulian verb for to be. In the affirmative presint indicatîf (present indicative), the tonic pronouns listed below are optional, but the atonic pronouns are mandatory and appear before the verb. For example, I am can be expressed as jo o soi or simply o soi; you are can be expressed as tu tu sês or simply tu sês; he is can be … Continue reading Friulian language series: present indicative of the verb jessi

Friulian language series: translation exercise 1

If you have worked through the posts pertaining to Gjenesi 1:1-10, Gjenesi 1:11-19 and Gjenesi 1:20-25, test your knowledge now by completing the exercises below. A. Give the plural form of these nouns, including the definite article: l’aghe il pomâr la jerbe la zornade l’ucel il nemâl la bestie il lusôr la stele l’ale B. Say the following in Friulian, as you have encountered them … Continue reading Friulian language series: translation exercise 1

Friulian language series: contraction of preposition + definite article

Friulian contractions of a preposition and definite article can sometimes take more than one form. In the overview below, not all variations are given; the contractions below have been chosen based on their appearance in the Friulian Bible. For example, the preposition a + definite article la can become either a la or ae, but ae is not included below because it is not used … Continue reading Friulian language series: contraction of preposition + definite article

Italian language series: Pinocchio, chapter 7 (part 3)

Pinocchio is starving, but he still manages to turn his nose up at food that has been offered to him. This post continues your study of chapter 7 of Le avventure di Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi. The first portion of text you will consider here reads: E il povero Pinocchio cominciò a piangere e a berciare così forte, che lo sentivano da cinque chilometri lontano. Geppetto, che … Continue reading Italian language series: Pinocchio, chapter 7 (part 3)