Learn Italian from Pinocchio: chapter 5, part 1

You now begin your study of the Italian language used in chapter 5 of Le avventure di Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi. Before beginning, I encourage you to read the entire chapter first; you will find a link in the index where you can read the book online.

Chapter 5 begins:

Pinocchio ha fame, e cerca un uovo per farsi una frittata; ma sul più bello, la frittata gli vola via dalla finestra. Intanto cominciò a farsi notte, e Pinocchio, ricordandosi che non aveva mangiato nulla, sentì un’uggiolina allo stomaco, che somigliava moltissimo all’appetito. Ma l’appetito nei ragazzi cammina presto, e di fatti, dopo pochi minuti, l’appetito diventò fame, e la fame, dal vedere al non vedere, si convertì in una fame da lupi, una fame da tagliarsi col coltello.

— Carlo Collodi, Le avventure di Pinocchio, capitolo 5

The first sentence in the portion of text above is the introduction to the chapter. The introduction reads: Pinocchio ha fame e cerca un uovo per farsi una frittata; ma sul più bello, la frittata gli vola via dalla finestra.

In this introduction, you discover that Pinocchio is hungry: ha fame. He looks for an egg to make himself an omelette: cerca un uovo per farsi una frittata. But, sul più bello (in the thick of it), his omelette flies out the window on him: la frittata gli vola via dalla finestra.

Un uovo (egg) is the singular form; the plural form is le uova. The singular form is masculine, and the plural form is feminine.

un uovo fresco
delle uova fresche
a fresh egg
fresh eggs

In the sentence la frittata gli vola via dalla finestra, the use of gli conveys what English does with on him. Similarly, on me is conveyed with mi; on you with ti, etc.

La frittata gli vola via dalla finestra.
The omelette flies away on him out the window.
The omelette flies out the window on him.

Mi è volato via il cappello.
My hat flew off on me.

The text continues: Intanto cominciò a farsi notte, e Pinocchio, ricordandosi che non aveva mangiato nulla, sentì un’uggiolina allo stomaco, che somigliava moltissimo all’appetito.

With the expression farsi notte, you can say in Italian to get late, to get dark.

Si sta facendo notte.
It is getting late. It is getting dark.

As it got late, Pinocchio remembered that he had not eaten anything: s’è ricordato che non aveva mangiato nulla, which is why he is hungry: ha fame. Remember, to say to be hungry in Italian, you use avere fame (literally, to have hunger). The same goes for to be thirsty: avere sete (literally, to have thirst).

Ho fame.
I am hungry.

Hai sete?
Are you thirsty?

Of course, when you start to get hungry, you will feel a rumble in your stomach: sentire un’uggiolina allo stomaco. Be sure to pronounce stomaco with the stress on the first syllable: lo stòmaco.

Where does the noun uggiolina come from? It derives from uggia (pronounced ùggia), meaning nuisance. Uggiolina, then, is a diminutive form of uggia; it literally means little nuisance and refers to the rumble you feel when hungry.

The text tells you the uggiolina that Pinocchio felt somigliava moltissimo all’appetito. The verb somigliare means to resemble, to look like, and it is a very important one to learn. Here, it is used to tell you that the rumble in Pinocchio’s stomach very much resembled appetite, or peckishness (somigliare all’appetito). It is used with the preposition a:

Lui somiglia a mio padre.
He looks like my father.

Tu somigli molto a tua madre.
You look a lot like your mother.

Questa camicia somiglia molto alla mia.
This shirt looks a lot like mine.

Getting back to appetito, it is used here in the sense of the beginning stages of hunger, not full-on fame. This is clear from the following portion of text: Ma l’appetito nei ragazzi cammina presto, e di fatti, dopo pochi minuti, l’appetito diventò fame.

But his hunger did not stop there: dal vedere al non vedere (in no time at all), it went from a normal fame to a fame da lupi. Un lupo is a wolf, and una fame da lupi is literally a wolves’ hunger; in other words, a raging hunger. The text reads: la fame, dal vedere al non vedere, si convertì in una fame da lupi, una fame da tagliarsi col coltello.

Si convertì is the third-person singular, passato remoto conjugation of the verb convertirsi, meaning to convert oneself, to turn into.

Si è convertito in polvere.
It turned to dust.

Da tagliarsi col coltello is a figurative expression you can use to highlight the excessive nature of something. The verb tagliare means to cut, and un coltello is a knife.

una fame da tagliarsi col coltello
a ravenous hunger (a hunger that could be cut with a knife)

un buio da tagliarsi col coltello
a pitch-black darkness (a darkness that could be cut with a knife)

This post’s portion of text can be understood as follows: Pinòcchio ha fàme (Pinocchio is hungry), e cérca un uòvo (and looks for an egg) per fàrsi una frittàta (to make himself an omelette); ma sul più bèllo (but in the thick of it), la frittàta gli vóla vìa (the omelette flies away on him) dàlla finèstra (out the window). Intànto cominciò a fàrsi nòtte (meanwhile, it started to get dark out), e Pinòcchio (and Pinocchio), ricordàndosi che non avéva mangiàto nùlla (remembering that he had not eaten anything), sentì un’uggiolìna àllo stòmaco (felt a rumble in his stomach), che somigliàva moltìssimo all’appetìto (which very much resembled an appetite). Ma l’appetìto néi ragàzzi cammìna prèsto (but a boy’s appetite grows quickly), e di fàtti (and sure enough), dópo pòchi minùti (after a few minutes), l’appetìto diventò fàme (his appetite became hunger), e la fàme (and his hunger), dal vedére al non vedére (in no time at all), si convertì in ùna fàme da lùpi (became ravenous), ùna fàme da tagliàrsi col coltèllo (a hunger that could be cut with a knife).

Key Italian usages appearing in this post include: avére fàme (to be hungry), avére séte (to be thirsty), cercàre (to look for), un uòvo (egg), le uòva (eggs), la frittàta (omelette), sul più bèllo (in the thick of it), volàre vìa (to fly away), la finèstra (window), il cappèllo (hat), fàrsi nòtte (to get late, dark), ricordàrsi che (to remember that), un’ùggia (nuisance), un’uggiolìna àllo stòmaco (rumble in the stomach), l’appetìto (appetite), somigliàre a (to look like, to resemble), camminàre prèsto (to go fast), di fàtti, difàtti (sure enough), il lùpo (wolf), ùna fàme da lùpi (raging hunger), convertìrsi (to convert oneself, to turn into), dal vedére al non vedére (in no time at all), la pólvere (dust), tagliàre (to cut), il coltèllo (knife), da tagliàrsi col coltèllo (“that can be cut with a knife”).