Learn Italian from Pinocchio: chapter 2, part 12

This twelfth part of your study of chapter 2 of Le avventure di Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi will look at the following portion of text in Italian:

— Ah! gli è con questo bel garbo, mastr’Antonio, che voi regalate la vostra roba? M’avete quasi azzoppito!… — Vi giuro che non sono stato io! — Allora sarò stato io!… — La colpa è tutta di questo legno… — Lo so che è del legno: ma siete voi che me l’avete tirato nelle gambe! — Io non ve l’ho tirato! — Bugiardo! — Geppetto, non mi offendete; se no vi chiamo Polendina!… — Asino! — Polendina! — Somaro! — Polendina! — Brutto scimmiotto! — Polendina! — A sentirsi chiamar Polendina per la terza volta, Geppetto perse il lume degli occhi, si avventò sul falegname, e lì se ne dettero un sacco e una sporta.

— Carlo Collodi, Le avventure di Pinocchio, capitolo 2

Geppetto loses his temper after being hit in the shins by the piece of wood; thinking it was the woodworker who had hit him, he yells: Ah! gli è con questo bel garbo, mastr’Antonio, che voi regalate la vostra roba?

Garbo is grace, politeness, manners.

muoversi con garbo
to move with grace, style

Non ha garbo nel vestire.
She does not know how to dress.

una persona di garbo
a well-mannered person

The verb regalare means to give away (as a gift), which you have already come across. La roba means stuff, things.

regalare la vostra roba
to give your things (away)

Getting back to the text, Geppetto uses sarcasm to draw attention to what he believes is the woodworker’s impertinence: ah! gli è con questo bel garbo (oh, it is with these kind manners) che voi regalate la vostra roba (that you give your things away). As for the gli è at the beginning of the line, this is a Tuscan usage simply meaning it is.

The adjective zoppo means crippled, lame. Someone who walks with a limp might be described as zoppo.

È zoppo dalla nascita.
He has walked with a limp since birth (literally, he is lame since birth).

Zoppo can also be used figuratively, in the sense of clunky.

Il tuo ragionamento è zoppo.
Your reasoning is clunky.

The adjective zoppo gives rise to the verbs azzoppire and azzoppare, meaning to cripple.

M’avete quasi azzoppito!
You almost crippled me!

The text continues with usages that you have already looked at, so they should not present problems:

— Vi giuro che non sono stato io!
— Allora sarò stato io!
— I swear to you it wasn’t me!
— So [are you saying] it was me then!

You can go back and review non sono stato io and sarò stato io in part 8, if necessary.

The falegname explains that the fault belongs with the piece of wood, not him: la colpa è tutta di questo legno (it is all the fault of this wood). Be sure to learn colpa now if you have not already.

Di chi è la colpa?
Whose fault is it?

È colpa mia.
It is my fault.

Non è colpa tua.
It is not your fault.

sentirsi in colpa
to feel guilty, at fault

Mi sento in colpa.
I feel guilty, at fault.

Geppetto states that he knows it is the wood’s fault: lo so che è del legno (I know that it is the wood’s; that is, I know that it is the wood’s fault). Lo so literally means I know it.

Geppetto continues:

Ma siete voi che me l’avete tirato nelle gambe!
But it is you who threw it at my legs!

The verb tirare means to throw. A leg is una gamba. Tirare nelle gambe, then, means to throw at the legs (literally, in the legs). Note how it is you who is said in Italian:

siete voi che
it is you who

Using tu, it becomes:

sei tu che
it is you who

Do not say è tu che, modelling yourself on the English it is you who. The subject in Italian is not it; it is you. With this in mind, can you say the following in Italian?

it is us who
it is them who

In Italian, these are:

siamo noi che
sono loro che

More examples:

Siamo noi che non capiamo.
It is us who do not understand.

Sei tu che mi chiami?
Is it you who is calling me?

Note how capiamo and chiami also agree with their subject.

Getting back to the text, you see:

— (…) siete voi che me l’avete tirato (…).
— Io non ve l’ho tirato.
— It is you who threw it at me.
— I did not throw it at you.

Of course, what Geppetto said in full is: siete voi che me l’avete tirato nelle gambe. Literally, this means it is you who threw it at me in the legs, but, in idiomatic English, it simply means it is you who threw it at my legs. With time, you will become used to how Italian often avoids saying my, your, etc., when talking about body parts.

Mi ha preso la mano.
He took my hand.

Me lo ha tirato in testa.
He threw it at my head.

Gliel’ho tirato in faccia.
I threw it in his face. (gliel’ho = gli l’ho)

Gepetto accuses the woodworker of being a liar: un bugiardo. The woodworker then tells Geppetto to not offend him: non mi offendete! (do not offend me!), otherwise he will call him Polendina: se no vi chiamo Polendina! (otherwise I shall call you Polendina; literally, otherwise I call you Polendina).

Geppetto throws a number of insults the woodworker’s way:

bugiardo, liar
asino, donkey, dunce)
somaro, donkey, dunce)
brutto scimmiotto, ugly monkey

Note that asino takes the stress on the first syllable.

The text continues a sentirsi chiamar Polendina per la terza volta (upon hearing himself be called Polendina for the third time). You will remember that you looked at the construction a sentirsi chiamare in part 7, which you can go back and review.

Geppetto lost his temper: perse il lume degli occhi. The expression here is perdere il lume degli occhi (to lose one’s temper, to fly into a rage), and perse is the third-person singular, passato remoto conjugation of the verb perdere (to lose). Lume means light.

Geppetto then rushes at the woodworker: si avventò sul falegname. Avventarsi su means to pounce, to attack, to throw oneself at.

And finally, se ne dettero un sacco e una sporta. Both un sacco and una sporta refer to a sort of bag. You might translate this semi-literally as they gave each other bagfuls of it (where dettero is the third-person plural, passato remoto conjugation of the verb dare, and ne means of it), but, in better English, you can simply say that they beat each other up. Un sacco e una sporta means loads, lots.

In conversations, you will often hear the expression un sacco di, lots of.

Gli ho fatto un sacco di domande.
I asked him lots of questions.

Mi ha raccontato un sacco di bugie.
He told me all sorts of lies.

Mi piace un sacco.
I like it a lot.

The portion of text examined in this post can be broken down as follows: — Ah! gli è con quésto bel gàrbo, mastr’Antònio (ah, it is with these kind manners, Mastr’Antonio), che vói regalàte la vòstra ròba (that you give your stuff away)? M’avéte quàsi azzoppìto (you almost crippled me)!… — Vi giùro che non sóno stàto ìo (I swear it was not me)! — Allóra sarò stàto ìo (oh, so it was me then)!… — La cólpa è tùtta di quésto légno (it is all the fault of this wood)… — Lo so che è del légno (I know it is the wood’s): ma siète vói che me l’avéte tiràto nélle gàmbe (but it is you who threw it at my legs)! — Io non ve l’ho tiràto (I did not throw it at you)! — Bugiàrdo (liar)! — Geppétto, non mi offendéte (Geppetto, do not offend me); se no vi chiàmo Polendìna (otherwise I shall call you Polendina)!… — Àsino (donkey)! — Polendìna (Polendina)! — Somàro (ass)! — Polendìna (Polendina)! — Brùtto scimmiòtto (ugly monkey)! — Polendìna (Polendina)! — A sentìrsi chiamàr Polendìna per la tèrza vòlta (upon hearing himself be called Polendina for the third time), Geppétto pèrse il lùme dégli òcchi (Geppetto lost the light from his eyes), si avventò sul falegnàme (threw himself on the woodworker), e lì se ne dèttero un sàcco e ùna spòrta (and then they beat each other up).

Key usages from this post include: il gàrbo (grace, manners), regalàre (to give away, to give as a gift), la ròba (stuff, things), gli è (it is; this is a Tuscan usage), zòppo (lame, cripple, clunky), azzoppìre, azzoppàre (to cripple), la nàscita (birth), dàlla nàscita (since birth), il ragionaménto (reasoning), giuràre (to swear, to assure), la cólpa (fault), lo so che… (I know that…), tiràre (to throw), la gàmba (leg), il bugiàrdo (liar), un àsino (donkey, ass, dunce), il somàro (donkey, ass, dunce), brùtto (ugly), lo scimmiòtto (monkey), tèrzo (third), la vòlta (time), il lùme (light), un òcchio (eye), gli òcchi (eyes), pèrdere (to lose), pèrdere il lùme dégli òcchi (to fly into a rage), avventàrsi su (to pounce, throw oneself at), il sàcco (bag), la spòrta (bag), un sàcco e ùna spòrta (loads, lots), un sàcco di (lots of), la bùgia (lie), la domànda (question).