Learn Italian from Pinocchio: chapter 4, part 5

Pinocchio has told the grillo that he does not care to study; the grillo continues to correct Pinocchio and, unsuccessfully, attempts to steer him in the right direction in life. This post continues your study of the language found in chapter 4 of Carlo Collodi’s Le avventure di Pinocchio. You will look at the following portion of text, in which you find a number of Tuscan usages: … Continue reading Learn Italian from Pinocchio: chapter 4, part 5

Study Italian from the Bible: Genesis 2, verses 8-14

In verses 8-14 from chapter 2 of the Book of Genesis in Italian, version Diodati 1821, you learn the names of the four rivers that branch out from one single river in the garden of Eden, or il giardino dell’Eden. I have translated the verses rather literally into English to help you grasp the sense of the Italian text. Verses 8-14 read as follows: 8Or il … Continue reading Study Italian from the Bible: Genesis 2, verses 8-14

Learn Italian from Pinocchio: chapter 4, part 4

Pinocchio does not care one bit about the great lesson told to him by the Grillo-parlante; he would rather chase butterflies and climb trees than go to school and study. You will look now at the following portion of text from chapter 4 of Carlo Collodi’s Le avventure di Pinocchio, where Pinocchio expresses his distaste for responsibility: — Canta pure, Grillo mio, come ti pare e piace: ma … Continue reading Learn Italian from Pinocchio: chapter 4, part 4

Italian translation exercise 15

If you have worked through the first three parts in your study of chapter 4 of Le avventure di Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi (part 1, part 2, part 3), then test your knowledge by translating the following sentences from English to Italian, using the vocabulary you have encountered. We have lived here for more than twenty years. Will you do me the favour of going away? He disobeyed (rebelled … Continue reading Italian translation exercise 15

Learn Italian from Pinocchio: chapter 4, part 3

In this next portion of text from chapter 4 of Le avventure di Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi, the Talking Cricket shares with Pinocchio una gran verità, or great truth: — Dimmi, Grillo, e tu chi sei? — Io sono il Grillo-parlante, e abito in questa stanza da più di cent’anni. — Oggi però questa stanza è mia — disse il burattino — e se vuoi farmi un vero piacere, vattene … Continue reading Learn Italian from Pinocchio: chapter 4, part 3

Learn Italian from Pinocchio: chapter 4, part 2

After being released by the carabiniere, Pinocchio took off running; he has now arrived home, where he finds a big talking cricket on the wall. In this post, you will look at the following portion of text from chapter 4 of Carlo Collodi’s Le avventure di Pinocchio: Giunto dinanzi a casa, trovò l’uscio di strada socchiuso. Lo spinse, entrò dentro, e appena ebbe messo tanto di paletto, … Continue reading Learn Italian from Pinocchio: chapter 4, part 2

Learn Italian from Pinocchio: chapter 4, part 1

With this post, you begin your study of the Italian used in chapter 4 of Le avventure di Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi. Before beginning the chapter 4 posts, I encourage you to read through the entire chapter first to become familiar with its contents. You will find a link in the index where you can read the book online. Chapter 4 begins: La storia di Pinocchio col Grillo-parlante, dove … Continue reading Learn Italian from Pinocchio: chapter 4, part 1

Italian translation exercise 14

Before you leave chapter 3 altogether and start chapter 4 of Le avventure di Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi, have a go at translating the following sentences from English to Italian, using the language you have seen in the last four parts (part 13, part 14, part 15, part 16). You are right to not trust him. He is very likely to hit him. I have not the slightest idea. The killer cut … Continue reading Italian translation exercise 14

Learn Italian from Pinocchio: chapter 3, part 16

This post completes your study of the Italian language appearing in chapter 3 of Carlo Collodi’s Le avventure di Pinocchio. Once you have completed your study of chapter 3, I encourage you to read the entire chapter again to appreciate your new understanding of the text in Italian. The last portion of chapter 3 reads: Insomma, tanto dissero e tanto fecero, che il carabiniere rimesse in libertà Pinocchio, e … Continue reading Learn Italian from Pinocchio: chapter 3, part 16

Learn Italian from Pinocchio: chapter 3, part 15

After Pinocchio throws himself to the ground, some of the onlookers in the street come to Pinocchio’s defence; in this post, you will look at the following portion of text in Italian from chapter 3 of Carlo Collodi’s Le avventure di Pinocchio: Chi ne diceva una, chi un’altra. — Povero burattino! — dicevano alcuni — ha ragione a non voler tornare a casa! Chi lo sa come lo picchierebbe quell’omaccio … Continue reading Learn Italian from Pinocchio: chapter 3, part 15